Indian Wars Discussed By Presidents Part V
 

 
 
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Rutherford B. Hayes

While in Office As President During the Term of March 4, 1877 to March 4, 1881.

Volume: VII   Page: 472

First Annual Message
                                                                                                          December 3, 1877.

Fellow-Citizens of the Senate and House of Representatives:

(excerpt) "The report of the Secretary of War shows that the Army has been actively employed during the year, and has rendered very important service in suppressing hostilities in the Indian country and in preserving peace and protecting life and property in the interior as well as along the Mexican border. A long and arduous campaign has been prosecuted, with final complete success, against a portion of the Nez Perce tribe of Indians. A full account of this campaign will be found in the report of the General of the Army. It will be seen that in its course several severe battles were fought, in which a number of gallant officers and men lost their lives. I join with the Secretary of War and the General of the Army in awarding to the officers and men employed in the long and toilsome pursuit and in the final capture of these Indians the honor and praise which are so justly their due.

RUTHERFORD B. HAYES

Volume: VII   Page: 502

Second Annual Message
                                                                                                         Executive Mansion, December 2, 1878.

Fellow-Citizens of the Senate and House of Representatives:

(excerpt)" While the conduct of the Indians generally has been orderly and their relations with their neighbors friendly and peaceable, two local disturbances have occurred, which were deplorable in their character, but remained, happily, confined to a comparatively small number of Indians. The discontent among the Bannocks, which led first to some acts of violence on the part of some members of the tribe and finally to the outbreak, appears to have been caused by an insufficiency of food on the reservation, and this insufficiency to have been owing to the inadequacy of the appropriations made by Congress to the wants of the Indians at a time when the Indians were prevented from supplying the deficiency by hunting. After an arduous pursuit by the troops of the United States, and several engagements, the hostile Indians were reduced to subjection, and the larger part of them surrendered themselves as prisoners. In this connection I desire to call attention to the recommendation made by the Secretary of the Interior, that a sufficient fund be placed at the disposal of the executive, to be used, with proper accountability, at discretion, in sudden emergencies of the Indian service.

RUTHERFORD B. HAYES

Volume: VII   Page: 572

Third Annual Message
                                                                                                        Executive Mansion, December 1, 1879

Fellow-Citizens of the Senate and House of Representatives:

(excerpt) The reports of the General of the Army and of his subordinates present a full and detailed account of the military operations for the suppression of hostilities among the Indians of the Ute and Apache tribes, and praise is justly awarded to the officers and troops engaged for promptness, skill, and courage displayed."

RUTHERFORD B. HAYES

Volume: VII   Page: 576

Third Annual Message
                                                                                                        Executive Mansion, December 1, 1879

Fellow-Citizens of the Senate and House of Representatives:

(excerpt) "The history of the outbreak on the White River Ute Reservation, in western Colorado, has become so familiar by elaborate reports in the public press that its remarkable incidents need not be stated here in detail. It is expected that the settlement of this difficulty will lead to such arrangements as will prevent further hostile contact between the Indians and the border settlements in western Colorado."

RUTHERFORD B. HAYES

President Chester A. Arthur while in Office during the term of September 19, 1881 to March 4, 1885.

Volume: VIII   Page: 38

First Annual Message
                                                                                                           Washington, December 6, 1881

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

(excerpt) "The surrender of Sitting Bull and his forces upon the Canadian frontier has allayed apprehension, although bodies of British Indians still cross the border in quest of sustenance. Upon this subject a correspondence has been opened which promises an adequate understanding. Our troops have orders to avoid meanwhile all collisions with alien Indians."

CHESTER A. ARTHUR

Volume: VIII   Page: 136

Second Annual Message
                                                                                                             Washington, December 4, 1882

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States:

(excerpt) "From the report of the Secretary of War it appears that the only outbreaks of Indians during the past year occurred in Arizona and in the southwestern part of New Mexico. They were promptly quelled, and the quiet which has prevailed in all other parts of the country has permitted such an addition to be made to the military force in the region endangered by the Apaches that there is little reason to apprehend trouble in the future."

CHESTER A. ARTHUR

President Grover Cleveland while in office during the term of March 4, 1885 to March 4, 1889.

Volume: VIII   Page: 348

First Annual Message
                                                                                                         Washington, December 8, 1885

To the Congress of the United States:

(excerpt) "Besides the troops which were dispatched in pursuit of the small band of Indians who left their reservation in Arizona and committed murders and outrages, two regiments of cavalry and one of infantry were sent last July to the Indian Territory to prevent an outbreak which seemed imminent. They remained to aid, if necessary, in the expulsion of intruders upon the reservation, who seemed to have caused the discontent among the Indians, but the Executive proclamation warning them to remove was complied with without their interference."

GROVER CLEVELAND

Volume: VIII   Page: 358

First Annual Message
                                                                                                            Washington, December 8, 1885

To the Congress of the United States:

(excerpt) :In May of the present year a small portion of the Chiricahua Apaches on the White Mountain Reservation, in Arizona, left the reservation and committed a number of murders and depredations upon settlers in that neighborhood. Though prompt and energetic action was taken by the military, the renegades eluded capture and escaped into Mexico. The formation of the country through which these Indians passed, their thorough acquaintance with the same, the speed of their escape, and the manner in which they scattered and concealed themselves among the mountains near the scene of their outrages put our soldiers at a great disadvantage in their efforts to capture them, though the expectation is still entertained that they will be ultimately taken and punished for their crimes.

The threatening and disorderly conduct of the Cheyennes in the Indian Territory early last summer caused considerable alarm and uneasiness. Investigation proved that their threatening attitude was due in a great measure to the occupation of the land of their reservation by immense herds of cattle, which their owners claimed were rightfully there under certain leases made by the Indians. Such occupation appearing upon examination to be unlawful notwithstanding these leases, the intruders were ordered to remove with their cattle from the lands of the Indians by Executive proclamation. The enforcement of this proclamation had the effect of restoring peace and order among the Indians, and they are now quiet and well behaved."

GROVER CLEVELAND

Volume: VIII    Page: 514

Second Annual Message
                                                                                                       Washington, December 6, 1886.

To the Congress of the United States:

(excerpt) "In September and October last the hostile Apaches who, under the leadership of Geronimo, had for eighteen months been on the war path, and during that time has committed many murders and been the cause of constant terror to the settlers of Arizona, surrendered to General Miles, the military commander who succeeded General Crook in the management and direction of their pursuit.

Under the terms of their surrender as then reported, and in view of the understanding which these murderous savages seemed to entertain of the assurances given them, it was considered best to imprison them in such manner as to prevent their ever engaging in such outrages again, instead of trying them for murder. Fort Pickens having been selected as a safe place of confinement, all the adult males were sent thither and will be closely guarded as prisoners. In the meantime the residue of the band, who, though still remaining upon the reservation, were regarded as unsafe and suspected of furnishing aid to those on the war path, had been removed to Fort Marion. The women and larger children of the hostiles were also taken there, and arrangements have been made for putting the children of proper age in Indian Schools."

GROVER CLEVELAND


                            

Website: The History Box.com
Article Name: Indian Wars Discussed By Presidents Part V
Researcher/Preparer/Transcriber Miriam Medina

Source:

BIBLIOGRAPHY: From my Collection of Books: "A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents 1789-1897". By James D. Richardson--a Representative from the State of Tennessee. Publisher: by Authority of Congress--1899. Ten volumes total. Copyright: 1897 by James D. Richardson.
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